Persuasion: Book Review

My deepest and sincerest apologies if this turns into a complete wreck. I don’t think I have ever done a decent book review my whole life, because I haven’t bothered making one except now. But there’s nothing wrong with trying, just like DanRad said on his SNL skit “I tried, therefore no one should criticize me.”. Lol.

I have always been a fan of Jane Austen’s works. And please do not take me for those other fools who say that they are, when the only book they have read is Pride and Prejudice.

Other Person: I love Jane Austen!

Me: Really? What novels of her have you read?

Other Person: Oh, just Pride and Prejudice.

Me: *face palm*

I don’t buy that, ever. Enough about me rambling. Pride and Prejudice is my all-time favorite, and Emma is my life story, but Persuasion holds a very special, precious spot in my heart.

Persuasion is a story about Anne Elliot, a lady of seven and twenty, who has all the possible graces a woman can have, except that their family is in debt due to her father’s careless spending. She was amiable, polite, and intelligible– all a man looking for a wife could ask for. But she, like most women nowadays (our species keep the most cliche traits over time, I tell you), has never gotten over her feelings for a certain man from when she was only nineteen. She was then engaged to Frederick Wentworth, but was short-lived due to the protests of their name-conscious family, for he was at that moment had a lack of fortune and career prospects.

After eight years, they meet again, and Frederick was known as Captain Wentworth, and is gifted with riches from his expeditions as a sailor. He is still hurt with the damage that Anne has given him, and proceeds to pursue the Musgroves sisters, Louisa and Henrietta, to hopefully torture Anne’s precious heart out of spite. But is this spite due to the fact that he still has feelings for her, just like Anne? Will their love be rekindled even after long years of separation and several circumstances?

What? You thought I’d give away the ending? Please, I’m not daft.

I don’t know if it’s just me, but I take comfort on the lives of the characters I read. Call me antisocial or whatnot, but I believe what makes a true writer is when you feel that the characters are someone that is close and dearest to you. This novel may have lacked humor like P&P and Emma, but Austen writes Anne’s feelings as if you can see through her soul, making you want to linger on the pages.

In times like these, it is very rare, and I mean very rare, for relationships to last with hindrances such as distance. I think I’ve heard my fair share of couples complaining that it is hard when the one you love is away. But Persuasion shows that true love, not matter the distance or the circumstance, will be burning with the same passion. If it is indeed true. I mean c’mon, eight years? That’s almost half of my life. And that second chances are not so bad to give, as long as it is rightful to do so. You’ll ever know if you wouldn’t try. I guess that saying “When you love someone, let them go. When they come back, they’re yours” is a tad bit true. But in times like these? I don’t know. I still have faith in humanity.

And may I just add, that this novel has the best love letter I have ever read my entire life. If I were Anne, I’d be squealing like a pig, which I was whilst reading. Just a little excerpt, because I’m a soilsport.

I can listen no longer in silence. I must speak to you by such means as are within my reach. You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope.

Two things I would like you all to take my word for: a second chance, and reading this book!

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1 thought on “Persuasion: Book Review”

  1. My favourite Jane Austen! A seriously underrated book. Whenever I get the the final part I cannot help but have a massive smile on my face. As entertaining as I find the ‘main’ Austen books, Persuasion has (in my opinion) more aspects that transcend generations.
    Lovely review.

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